Everything Gourmet

A Resplendent Renaissance Looms at the Louvre

Andrea del Verrocchio and workshop. Two Angels, circa 1480. Paris, musée du Louvre, département des Sculptures © RMN – Grand Palais (Musée du Louvre) / René-Gabriel Ojéda.

Paris-France — They are looming, looming magnificent statues in one of the finest exhibitions of Renaissance sculpture to be presented in France. And now they are looming, alone in the Louvre, waiting for the museums in Paris and France to re-open. But until they do, The Gourmet Gazette brings this spectacular show to you.

Antonio del Pollaiolo, Hercules Slaying Antaeus. Florence. Musée national du Bargello © Su concessione del Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali e per il Turismo, Museo Nazionale del Bargello.

The show entitled Body and Soul, Italian Renaissance from Donatello to Michelangelo, organized in conjunction with the Castello Sforzesco Museum in Milan, aims to shed light on the main themes and ideas developed in Italy during the second half of the Quattrocento, the second half of the 15th century. The Bacchus and Ariane by Tullio Lombardo in marble embodies a certain gentleness, the Two Flying Angles from Andrea del Verrocchio astound by the expressions on their faces, Michelangelo’s chained Dying Slave and chained Rebellious Slave offer a world of contrasts. The Dying Slave is young and appears to be in a deep sleep while the Rebellious Slave appears to be well, rebellious and struggling.

Michelangelo Buonarroti, known as Michelangelo. The Dying Slave. 1513-1516. Paris, musée du Louvre, département des Sculptures © Musée du Louvre, dist. RMN – Grand Palais / Raphaël Chipault.
Michelangelo Buonarroti, known as Michelangelo. The Rebellious Slave. 1513-1516. Paris, musée du Louvre, département des Sculptures © Musée du Louvre, dist. RMN – Grand Palais / Raphaël Chipault.

It was a period when the artists sought to represent the human figure in the diversity of its movements, they sought to express feelings. The show brings together some 140 works including those by some of the greatest sculptors of the day like Donatello and Michelangelo but as well the lesser know artists whose works are difficult to access because of their location in a church or a small village.

Tullio Lombardo, Bacchus and Ariane, circa 1505-1510. Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum © Kunsthistorischesmuseum, Vienna.

Diverse styles emerged during the second half of the 15th century to the beginning of the 16th century, the period regarded as the apogee of the Renaissance, and they emerged throughout the peninsula from Florence to Venice to Rome. Sketches, drawings and paintings of the time are juxtaposed with the sculptures. And virtual tours of this show and others are available on the Louvre’s website.
©Trish Valicenti for The Gourmet Gazette
Renaissance sculpture exhibition showing through to January 18th
https://www.louvre.fr/en/homepage

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