Gourmet Fair

Paris: In Liberation

Henri Rol-Tanguy in the command post of the French Forces of the Interior at the Place Denfert Rochereau. Reconstitution after the liberation of Paris. ©Archives nationales. droits reserves (all rights reserved). Handout via The Gourmet Gazette

Paris, France — It is a unique journey into a unique and critical time. The Musée de la Liberation de Paris plunges the visitor into Paris after World War I, the economic hardships that followed and on into the occupation of Paris and its subsequent liberation. The history revolves around two men who were critical to the Liberation of France and what was perhaps its most powerful symbol, that of Paris: Philippe de Hauteclocque and Jean Moulin. The latter would remain in France and become a key figure of the resistance movement while the former went to England joining Charles de Gaulle. The war leader would be known as Leclerc, the name on his English identity card.

Looking out onto the Nicolas Ledoux square onto the Musée de la Libération de Paris – Musée du général Leclerc – Musée Jean Moulin © Ch. Batard, Agence Artene courtesy Musée de la Libération de Paris. Handout via The Gourmet Gazette

The chronological path through the museum, which begins in 1918, offers an intense look into life in France, particularly Paris, until the Allied Landing in 1944 and the fight for the Liberation of Paris through objects, documents, audio-visual presentations and photographs. It also offers a keen insight into the role of the French Forces of the Interior, the French resistance fighters.

Into the command post of Colonel Rol-Tanguy. Photo ©Pierre Antoine courtesy Musée de la Libération de Paris. Handout via The Gourmet Gazette

The visit winds up with a light-filled atrium devoted to liberated Paris. For the more adventurous and dynamic visitors you can descend the 100 steps to the command post and rooms occupied by a hero of the liberation Henri Rol-Tanguy, alias Colonel Rol and the French Forces of the Interior from which the liberation of Paris was orchestrated. A visit to the command post in augmented reality is also available upon reservation.

Alberto Giacometti at work. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti Paris+ ADAGP, Paris) 2021. Handout via The Gourmet Gazette

The museum is currently showcasing the works of the sculptor and artist Alberto Giacometti devoted to the Colonel Rol in an exhibition entitled Rol-Tanguy by Giacometti running until the end of January. The works are the fruit of the encounters between the two men in 1946, a year and half after the liberation of Paris. The some 40 sculptures, drawings and portraits are on loan from the Foundation Giacometti, They hover between the real and the abstract and are being show for the first time, offering an insight into how Giacometti conceived his work.

Alberto Giacometti, Head of Colonel Rol-Tanguy, 1946, Painted plaster. ©Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti Paris+ ADAGP, Paris) 2021. Handout via The Gourmet Gazette

The Giacometti and Rol-Tanguy exhibition is running to January 30th and a new exhibition devoted to women war photographers is slated to begin on March 8th running until December 31st. The visit to the permanent collections and the command post are free of charge while there is a fee for entrance to the exhibitions.
©Trish Valicenti for The Gourmet Gazette

The Musée de la Libération de Paris -Musée du Général Leclerc – Musée Jean Moulin
4 avenue du Colonel Rol Tanguy, Place Denfert Rochereau
75014 Paris
+33 (0)1 71 28 34 70
https://www.museeliberation-leclerc-moulin.paris.fr/en

The Liberation de Paris, rue de Rivoli, 25 August 1945 ©National Archives and Records Administration. Courtesy Musée de la Libération de Paris. Handout via The Gourmet Gazette

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